Question

CAN I TAME A VERY YOUNG WILD RABBIT?.?

I FOUND 4 LITTLE BABY RABBITS OUTSIDE IN A BUSH. IF ID HAVE TO GUESS I'D SAY THEY ARE ABOUT TWO TO THREE WEEKS OLD. THEY ARE REALLY TINY. I HAVE BEEN BOTTLE FEEDING THEM NOW FOR FOUR DAYS. THEY ARE EATING CELERY AND THEY HAVE JUST STARTED EATING RABBIT FOOD THAT I BOUGHT FROM THE PET STORE BUT, THEY SEEM TO LIKE THE CELERY AND CARROTS MORE. THEY HAVE PUT ON ALOT OF WEIGHT SINCE I'V HAD THEM. IM REALLY GETTING ATTATCHED TO THEM AND WOULD LIKE TO KEEP THEM AS A PET BUT, IM NOT SURE IF I CAN TAME A WILD RABBIT. THEY SEEM TO BE CONTENT SITTING IN MY LAP WRAPPED UP IN A LITTLE BLANKET. WHEN MY MOM AND SISTER TRY TO HOLD THEM THEY LIKE SPAZ OUT BUT, THEY DO NOT DO THAT WITH ME. IM AFRAID THAT WHEN THEY GET OLDER THEY MITE START BITTING. WILL THEY BE ABLE TO BE TAMED?

Answers

Yes, Holly, You can tame the baby rabbits. They were not out in the wild to begin with but in town so traffic and people didn't scare the mother . You just have to be consistent in caring for them. If you want them for pets you will have to feed them 4 to 5 times a day at the same time but the main thing besides feeding them is to hold them in your lap and handle them frequently throughout the day. Provide them with clean water everyday and a clean cage for when you can not be holding / handling them but petting and talking to them is the most important thing at this age. Hope this helps !

#1

Yes they become easily domesticated. It's important they eat the pellets, get a salt lick too. The carrots and celery should only be snacks, and celery along with other "juicy" fruits and veggies should be fed sparingly so they don't get diarrhea.

Best of luck!

ADD: MJF, I didn't say they were domesticated rabbits, I said they are easily domesticated, there is a difference, and I have been in WILDLIFE rescue most of my life as well as domestic rescue. I won't give my age, but I am a grandmother. No different than domesticating any other wild animal, unless it's predatory, which rabbits and hares are not. Thanks!

#2

When an animal is "domesticated" it's wild, survival instincts are reduced to a point where that animal lives more comfortably in our environment. Wild rabbits are not a domesticated "breed". That means, their instincts are there 100%, and are aimed at keeping the animal safe in a dangerous, wild environment. As babies, most rabbits are relatively friendly, but when the hormones kick in at puberty, the rabbit's instincts to survive and breed hit full force, and the once friendly baby becomes much harder to handle.

I think it's possible to "tame" these rabbits, but you are likely to find that as they get older, they will become significantly less friendly. They will also be much more easily startled than a domestic breed of rabbit, and will resent being handled. They are unlikely to "bond" with you as their every instinct drives them to try to escape you (a potentially dangerous predator) and their cage (to a wild rabbit, being "trapped" is a death sentence).

I think you will find these rabbits disappointing pets and not much like domestic rabbits at all once they grow up a little.

#3

Since they depend on you to feed them they accept you. Since you got them so young you should be able to tame them. Continue handling them everyday not just while they are eating. Get other people to interact with them while they are young so they accept it better. Wear long sleeves in case they scratch. At this point turning them back outside would be a death sentence for the baby bunnies because they do not have another adult rabbit to show them how to find food and watch out for predators. Make sure you seperate them sometimes because they will have to be seperated soon because rabbits can reproduce at a very young age.

#4

i guess? give it a shot

#5