Question

Can you breed a brother and sister dog?

me and my partner have just bought boxer puppies and wondered if in the future we can mate them or would there be health problems or mental issues if we did this.

Answers

_ Page 1

NO! First, would you mate with your brother or sister? What would your children be like, same goes for a dog!

I know you love your dog, but be responsible about this:

Responsible breeders...

* Do not sell their pups to or through pet stores. Instead, they personally screen and select homes for their puppies, advise people on caring for the breed, turn away people whose lifestyle, commitment or home situation does not fit the breed, test for and guarantee the health and temperament of their puppies, have detailed documentation of their pups' lineage, demonstrate knowledge about canine health, genetics, socialization and development, and take back their animals at any time and age if the buyers cannot keep them.

* Do not sell multiple breeds of dogs, since they specialize in one or two breeds.

* Demonstrate extensive knowledge of the breed's history, traits, temperament, and conformation. They have years of experience with the breed.

* Are involved in the showing of purebred dogs. This can take the form of respected dog shows, locally and nationally, and competitions involving obedience trials, sport and athletics. Show and performance events enable responsible breeders to ensure that their dogs display the desired physical and behavioral traits desired for the particular breed. Every litter of show puppies has some dogs that will never compete in the show ring, often because they have physical traits that do not totally conform to exacting breed standards. However, these pups have been raised with as much planning, medical attention and socialization as their show-quality littermates and make wonderful pets. While ranked dogs are a plus, rank itself is not a sole indicator of quality. It is desirable for the parent dogs to have earned titles on both ends of the dogs' names (Ch. and CGC/TT/TDI at the other end). Note: AKC registry alone does not guarantee a healthy dog or even one that conforms to breed standards. AKC staff do not visit breeders to view the pups; registration is typically done through mail and involves the honor system.

* Keep their dogs as house pets, so they know that the offspring will be good pets as well.

* Value their reputation for seeking to improve the breed. They do not sell pups as a for-profit business. Indeed, many reputable breeders lose money, since breeding and caring for puppies in a responsible, quality-focused manner is typically expensive. They breed only dogs that are themselves good pets and fine representatives of their breed.

* Evaluate the health of their pups using sound, standardized genetic and other testing recommended for the individual breed. Tests include OFA (hip x-ray certification), CERF (Canine Eye Registry Foundation), Penn-Hip (hip joint laxity), SAS (subaortic stenosis, a heart defect common to some popular breeds), thyroid and other measures. They also test dogs for sexually transmitted diseases, like Brucellosis, prior to breeding a litter. Thorough genetic screening enables responsible breeders to minimize their chances of producing a health-compromised puppy.

* Provide full, lifetime written guarantees covering genetic disease and temperament problems.

* Take back the dog at any point in his or her life for whatever reason the purchaser no longer wants or can care for the animal.

* Place all pet quality animals with a contract requiring the purchaser to spay/neuter the pup.

* Provide advice and guidance to purchasers. Interview and usually visit the homes of prospective puppy purchasers, placing pups only with people who demonstrate they can provide safe, responsible homes.

* Has at least the mother dog on premises and let prospective purchasers observe the dog and her health and behavior. Responsible breeders breed their female dog to the best male, not the most convenient one.

* Breed only dogs over 2 years old, and breeds the dog only a limited number of times; not every year

* Line up qualified buyers in advance of birth of a litter and rarely ever advertise.

* Do not separate a pup from the mother and litter before 8 weeks of age. Also deworm and vaccinate their puppies.

* Can provide references for happy puppy buyers.

Be responsible, spay and neuter your dog. Leave the puppies to rescue organizations, humane societies etc. Don't become a backyard breeder just because there aren't puppies available in your area.

#1

Yes, you can.

#2

yes you can because animals dont know the difference

#3

only if your goal is to produce puppies with defects

spay and neuter.

#4

SPAY/NEUTER your damn dogs.

#5

You can and it's called inbreeding ... don't do it. There can be possible health and/or mental issues as well.

#6

Go to a shelter. Take a look at how many unwanted animals are there because of people like you who think puppies are cute so you might as well 'breed' some of your own. Then take both of your animals to be spayed and neutered.

#7

Would you allow your son and daughter to have children together.

No dogs that are brother and sister should never be allowed to mate.

Have these dogs spayed and neutered and leave breeding dogs to reputable breeders,

Instead of becoming another BYBer.

#8